The Problems With LinkedIn

Where to even start with LinkedIn… I never liked the concept of having a social media platform “just” for business; it adds extra weird rules that Facebook, Instagram and Twitter didn’t have but also generated the same problems. In the end, you still wonder if you should add someone or not, if and when it is acceptable to remove them, what kind of content will come to bite you in the ass and the measurement of your self-worth by the number of followers or “connections” you have. On LinkedIn, just like Instagram, you find the trolls trying to sell you crap and scam you but most of all, idiots who are just trying to find fake friends. Lastly, LinkedIn publishes the profiles you visit!

No, I don’t want to be your friend, weirdo who lives half way across the world!

Useless Online Profile

Besides general social media problems, LinkedIn has create a platform where employers, employees, recruiters and prospective employees use for no apparent reason. I believe LinkedIn was invented to replace the need of resumes, a place where employers could know everything about their future employees, however, no one ever stopped asking for resumes, it just became mandatory to add your LinkedIn profile to it. After sending out too many job applications to count, I always wondered why I even added my LinkedIn profile, only a very small handful of employers actually looked at my online profile.

A dining room scene with a laptop showing LinkedIn. It depicts a job hunting scenario.
Photo by Louis-Philippe Joly

The biggest problem with sending a tailored resume with your LinkedIn profile link is that your online profile is NOT tailored to the job description, and most of the time, are completely different. Isn’t this confusing for the employers? Do they all think we are full of shit? Am I the only one who sees a huge problem here? You are telling me I absolutely need to tailor my resume AND also give you access to a second resume that is irrelevant.

Obviously there are ways around this; I removed all job information except titles and names of my past employers. I even removed specific dates in order to have as little information as possible. Now if only LinkedIn would let us tailor our profiles to properly highlight the sections and skills you want to show off or custom links to send to different employers. Sending out customs links with tailored information would truly eliminate the need for formal resumes.

The worst algorithm!

I probably tried every single job hunting website available in Canada and LinkedIn is by far the wort one. I will set aside Job Boom and Monster.ca since they are mostly for a category of jobs I am not interested in (waiters, sales clerks, general contract work, etc.). LinkedIn’s algorithm is the worst; I get the most bizarre search results, from nurses, to sales representatives and let’s not forget accounting. I passed too many hours combing through irrelevant results that I stopped using LinkedIn altogether.

Keyword: Marketing – Results: Anything but marketing…

In my opinion, the best website is Indeed.ca, it works more as a search engine tool and its algorithm is very accurate. It has been a great one stop shop and the website I use the most. Obviously it does not come without its faults, however, they are nothing compared to LinkedIn. My second pick is Glassdoor.ca, but is used more in the tech industry.

The Recruiters. Please make them stop!

As I mentioned above, my LinkedIn profile has little information on my actual passed job duties, however, every single week I have several recruiters sending me private messages saying “How amazing my profile is”, or “you are a perfect fit for this job.” Most of the time, the jobs do not even come close to what I was doing or my skills. There is a reason why we have skills and recommendations on our profiles, so how come recruiters do not read them before sending us useless messages? Let’s not forget that most of the time these recruiters refuse to send the job description via LinkedIn or email.

LinkedIn should prohibit recruiters from sending unrelated job solicitations, or prohibit them from sending messages all together. At the very least, come up with a code of best practices and let us, the users, have the option to report them.

Faulty Job Statistics and Skills

I am convinced that LinkedIn falsifies the posting statistics, probably depending on how much an employer is paying them. I have encountered jobs that advertised “300+ or 400+ applications already sent” only a few hours after the job was posted, which is nearly impossible. I wonder if employers think such a statement would encourage users to apply, it does the complete opposite for me. How am I able to compete with all those people?

Lastly, LinkedIn should prohibit the use of adding too many required skills to a job description. I have seen employers who add 10, 15 or even 20 required skills and they vary from just about anything. Absolute non-sense most of the time. Employers should only be allowed to post a maximum of five required skills to match. Don’t forget that you will learn most of the skills on the job.

The practices on LinkedIn need to change and fast. I hope businesses will stop using LinkedIn as a necessary tool for recruitment and change their ways. They can use websites like Indeed.ca, a simple and effective tool, that I assume is much cheaper to use.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s